Test Your Audience


Even more importantly, though, leaders have to test for understanding. A leader has to put his or her finger on the pulse of the organization, so as to determine whether people heard and comprehended the message. How do you put your finger on the pulse of your firm? Certainly, managing by walking around helps. Meeting people informally, perhaps in small group lunches in the cafeteria, can be useful as well. Finding ways to solicit and address employee questions is crucial. Asking them to play back what they have heard from their managers is a useful technique. Listen carefullyas they speak to you. Don’t put words in their mouths. Ask them to be as specific as possible about the sources of their confusion.

Source: Communicate Goals, Then Test for Understanding & Learn from Your Audience

Can Better Teamwork Save Lives?

Q: What does a care coordination failure look like?

A care coordination failure is anytime there’s a gap in your care. For instance, if you go to the hospital and your hospital visit was not communicated to your doctor, that would be a care coordination failure. Because you really need that continuity from the hospital back to your primary care, so you aren’t readmitted.

You can also think about care coordination between specialist and generalist. If you’re seeing a psychiatrist, are the medications you’re getting from your psychiatrist being communicated back to your primary healthcare clinician? Because the patients that are taking up the most healthcare resources have a lot of chronic conditions simultaneously, coordination among their different providers is really key, both to the patient’s health and to keeping costs down. Coordination failures are associated with overtreatment, undertreatment, hospital readmissions, and also, ultimately, because of the inability to control chronic conditions, fatality.

Source: Can Better Teamwork Save Lives?

Priorities and Focus

My former colleague, Morten Hansen, has written a terrific new book titled, “Great at Work: How top Performers Work Less and Achieve More.”   Hansen built a dataset of roughly 5,000 individuals from all levels of organizations, from the C-suite to the factory floor.  He examined their performance, as well as their habits, routines, and work practices.   In the book, Hansen describes seven principles that characterize the approach of top performers.
His first principle, and perhaps most interesting one, is “doing less, then obsessing.” Hansen published an essay in the Wall Street Journal recently, in which he describes this principle. He writes,
The common practice we found among the highest-ranked performers in our study wasn’t at all what we expected. It wasn’t a better ability to organize or delegate. Instead, top performers mastered selectivity. Whenever they could, they carefully selected which priorities, tasks, meetings, customers, ideas or steps to undertake and which to let go. They then applied intense, targeted effort on those few priorities in order to excel.