Human rights in a changing sociopolitical climate

Human rights in a changing sociopolitical climate

“We designed and distributed our survey before the presidential election. Our response rates were relatively low before election night but surged the following week,” said Utr�an, lead author of the study and a refugee from Bosnia-Herzegovina. “Organizations became concerned about their ability to facilitate the resettlement of refugees broadly and Syrian refugees specifically given Mr. Trump’s campaign-trail rhetoric.”

According to the study, organizations struggled with obtaining basic resources for refugees upon their arrival to the United States, including trouble finding housing for large families, helping parents find work and providing individuals inclusive cultural orientation training.

However, the study suggests none of these troubles were their fault.

“Organizations were strangled by recent policy changes that cut their funding dramatically and, in doing so, indirectly reduced their capacity to serve the most vulnerable members of society,” said Utr�an. “Most refugees who come to the United States are women and children. The consequences of limited access to basic needs worsens existing mental health problems from going through countless stressful events, particularly in children.”

The study also found that misinformation was not only a significant source of anti-refugee sentiment but also deepened mistrust between politicians and the public.

Source: Research brief: Human rights in a changing sociopolitical climate


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