Uncategorized Will you be the same person 50 years from now?

Will you be the same person 50 years from now?

The results of a new study, the first to test how personality might change over 50 years and relying on the same data source at both time points, finds that broad patterns of thoughts, feelings and behaviors – personality – do change, and this change appears to accumulate with time. But don’t compare yourself to …

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Uncategorized People use, and lose, biases to make decisions

People use, and lose, biases to make decisions

From love and politics to health and finances, humans can sometimes make decisions that appear irrational, or dictated by an existing bias or belief. But a new study from Columbia University neuroscientists uncovers a surprisingly rational feature of the human brain: A previously held bias can be set aside so that the brain can apply …

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Uncategorized Declines in life expectancy across high income countries

Declines in life expectancy across high income countries

This is the first time in recent decades that these many high income countries simultaneously experienced declines in life expectancy for both men and women, and the size of these declines were larger than in the past. In the non-US countries, these declines were largely concentrated at ages 65 and older and likely related to …

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Uncategorized Rooting for the Home Team

Rooting for the Home Team

Conflicts about social hierarchy, tension around religious differences, and even betting on Super Bowl winners share the dynamics of us and them. Rather than approaching each example separately, Dunham argues that the us-and-them phenomenon can explain most of the observations we have about inter-group dynamics, and the things it fails to explain should then constitute …

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Uncategorized Intermittent Collaboration Leads to Best Collective Performance

Intermittent Collaboration Leads to Best Collective Performance

New research by Harvard Business School associate professor Ethan Bernstein and colleagues, to be published online next week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS), suggests that “always on” may not be always effective. “Intermittently on” might, instead, be better for complex problem solving. In their study …

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Uncategorized How to defend against fake news

How to defend against fake news

The key to people’s accepting fake news as true, despite evidence to the contrary, is a phenomenon known as confirmation bias, or the tendency for people to seek and accept information that confirms their existing beliefs while rejecting or ignoring that which contradicts those beliefs, he said. Many of these beliefs and biases are formed …

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Uncategorized New theory  of depression cause may improve treatments

New theory  of depression cause may improve treatments

A new area in depression research suggests dysfunction in mitochondria — the main source of energy for cells — could lead to major depression. Published in Frontiers in Neuroscience, this new insight to long-held theories on the causes of depression could lead to the development of novel and more effective antidepressant drugs. Depression is a …

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Uncategorized Older adults need better questions about their memory

Older adults need better questions about their memory

Healthcare providers and researchers rely on screening questions to detect patients who may be at risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease and other aging-related problems, but how these questions are worded may be confusing or trigger emotional responses. According to Penn State researchers, this may result in patients who answer the same questions differently, and for …

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Uncategorized Stress improves bad news processing

Stress improves bad news processing

The Wellcome-funded research, published in The Journal of Neuroscience, reveals that a known tendency of people to take more notice of good news than bad news – the optimism bias – disappears when people feel threatened. “Generally, people are quite optimistic – we ignore the bad and embrace the good. And this is indeed what …

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Uncategorized Measuring and implementing inclusive culture

Measuring and implementing inclusive culture

In June 2016, the team used a novel method developed by Frances Barg, MD, a professor of Family Medicine and Community Health, to gather 315 anonymous stories about experiences with inclusion or lack thereof in response to two open-ended questions posed to employees, faculty, and students of four health science schools and six hospitals, including …

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